TAAG invites you to Ghana for the 2015 Students Conference

TAAGlogoTAAG has confirmed that the Ghana TBA alumni group will be the host of the next African students conference. The group won the hotly contested bid against the Nigeria and Cameroon TBA alumni groups in a process that involved voting by the coordinators of the 13 TBA alumni groups. Congratulating the winning host, Godwin Tanda of Cameroon thanked all the alumni groups who participated in the polls, noting that, “their decisions and choices were thoughtful” and that, “the Ghanaian Group was best placed to host the student conference in 2015”. Praising the Ghanaian team for their win, the acting TAAG President Margaret Awuor added, “I am looking forward to working together with you towards making the next TAAG conference most memorable!” Continue reading “TAAG invites you to Ghana for the 2015 Students Conference”

A powerful conservation tool

As scientists, we have the ‘publish or perish rule’ entrenched in our DNA. In any conference, scientific meeting or course, our minds are shaped to follow this rule and our efforts are channeled into that path leading to publication. But is that it? The efforts put in the research, the field encounters and the information gathered culminates into graphs and p-values under certain word limits restricted by journal editors.

Do not get me wrong, science and its by product- publishing in peer reviewed journals is of central importance in our understanding of species and the interventions required for their conservation. However, when it comes to the effectiveness of conservation messages, I argue that a picture has a distinct hands down advantage over the best well written paper published even in high impact factor journals such as Science.

Where species face imminent threats simple pictures can be very useful in sending messages.
Where species face imminent threats simple pictures can be very useful in sending messages.

For example, anyone remember the picture on the left? Following   rules of photography or not,  this picture arguably had more impact on conservation of these incredible creatures than any long term study by any elite university or world renowned  conservation biologist. Continue reading “A powerful conservation tool”

Studying the Udzungwa Red Colobus monkey in Tanzania

5 TBA alumni Groups were awarded the TBA small grant to undertake research projects in 2013. Below are updates from the Tanzania TBA Alumni Association as they started data collection for their project: “The Udzungwa Red Colobus (Procolobus badius gordonorum) adaptability to major habitat destruction in Kalunga Forest Reserve, Morogoro, Tanzania”.

Udzungwa red colobus
Udzungwa red colobus

Our project team scheduled the first field work for the dry season (July to October) last year. As our study aims to find out the survival strategies of the Udzungwa Red Colobus monkey (Procolobus badius gordonorum) in both dry and wet seasons, the dry season was targeted first before the onset of the short rains season in December. Continue reading “Studying the Udzungwa Red Colobus monkey in Tanzania”